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  • What is a Bone Biddy?  (Bon  Bi dd ee; plural Bidd ee z).  A Bone Biddy was the term coined by Dr. Robert T. Bakker to denote a group of people that were interested in cleaning fossils in the Prep Lab in the dinosaur museum in Glenrock.  Males can be Bone Biddies but if they protest too much then we gracefully refer to them as “Bone Buddies”. They are subjected to rigorous training, then, they work for a coffee break or high tea and intermittent treats provided by one of our bakers.  The group also gives tours of the Paleon Museum, cleans, empties trash, does fundraising, works in the gift shop, crafts some items for the gift shop and have been known to take on plumbing challenges, etc..

    We will introduce you to a new Biddy each month, keep you up to date on Paleon happenings and train anybody who would like to join us.

    The first B.B. that we present to you left us on October 15, 2010 with a big hole in our hearts.  Shirley Davis set the standard for us all.  She was one of the original preparators when we began our journey as a fledgling museum and she worked tirelessly until about a week before she went up to the “Big Museum” in the sky to assist wherever she could in a higher capacity.

    Shirley lived in Oregon and the Davis family and the Scott families had homes on the same block (B.B. Barb Scott).  Shirley and her husband George raised four children and celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1992.  She lost George to a fall from his horse while hunting and she still embraced life and did all she could to contribute and she certainly did more than her share.

    Shirley took part in a theater group, she was a sorority sister that helped keep the flower beds in downtown beautiful, she drove friends to medical appointments or wherever they needed to go no matter the weather.  She loved to cook and prepared dishes for many people, including meals on wheels and she was a noted chili chef.  She won our ‘yearly’ chili feed so many times that she finally refused to enter it in competition.  She played Bunco with the same gusto that she did everything.

    Shirley brought Barb to the museum when Barb retired and moved to Glenrock.

    After a number of years of experience we had the head of the Chicago Field Museum of Natural History visit us and he wanted to commend the Bone Biddies on the quality of work they were doing and he said that Shirley was the Queen of all preparers.  He said he would like to kidnap the group and take them to Chicago.

    Shirley was the most prolific of our Bone Biddies and her understanding of anatomy was learned the hard way.  She grew up with animals, hunted game and had the ability to feel her bone and we shared her pride in never leaving a tool mark on her fossil.

    We salute her and remember her fondly as the quintessential Bone Biddy.